Category Archives: Blog

Looking closely

Over the past months, I have taken a lot of photos of landscapes and seascapes. They will start to appear in my photo gallery.

But this post is about taking the time to get close up to things, taking a very intimate approach to photography… 

Queen Anne's lace seedhead, macro photography by Andrée Fredette

Ordinary things hold mysteries, and those are revealed by the lens. Like Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota), that very common wildflower, at the end of the season, all curled up.

Belly feathers of an American Goldfinch. Macro photograph by Andrée Fredette

Or the belly feathers of an unfortunate American Goldfinch, which died after flying into a window.

Condensation on the side of a Brita filter. Macro photo by Andrée Fredette

Or the abstract condensation pattern on the side of the Brita filter.

 

Fiddlehead ficus leaf, detail. Macro photo by Andrée Fredette

 
Or the back of a Fiddlehead ficus, all dried up and revealing its patterns in the afternoon sunlight.

Macro shot of kelp on a beach in Ucluelet, BC. Photo by Andrée Fredette

Or the otherworldly creature-like appearance of this kelp bit of flotsam, on a beach in Ucluelet, BC.

Apple, after rinsing. Macro photo by Andrée Fredette

And the drops left on a McIntosh apple, after a rinse in the sink, and before the apple pie baking session…

The Passage of Time – An exhibition of my photos

Everyone is cordially invited to the opening reception of my  exhibition, June 24, 4 to 6 p.m. The opening will be followed by a dinner prepared by chef Hubertus Surm.
(Reservations for dinner: 250-539-5177)

The exhibition at the Saturna Café goes to August 2, 2017.

The Passage of Time - Photo Exhibition by Andrée Fredette, June 24-August 1st, 2017

“Narrative is anchored in the passage of time. A story unfolds in the tension between a beginning and an end. Singly and in juxtaposition, these photographs by Andrée Fredette are replete with stories. An image of a seemingly deserted Mayne Queen is paired with a photograph of a ghostly Saturna, producing a tinge of anxiety and uncertainty. Again, an empty path in the forest tells a tale of fear and disquiet. Further, the infinitely small (feathers) and the infinitely vast (the awesome sky) are conjured up. There are no figures in these photographs despite the great variety of subject matter. An irony resides in these works: it is suggested that they evoke the passage of time, yet photography congeals duration. This irony adds a layer of complexity — a dialectical interplay — to our experience of these artworks: we move from duration to time’s suspension and back again. Also, some of these works underline the materiality of the photographic medium, a salutary move in the era of digital media. Meditation portrays an ethereal, almost monochromatic sky — the surface of the photograph is underlined. Also, grains of sand and the grain of the photographic object conjoin in a literal manner. There is a hint of nostalgia in all these works: the backing in aluminum recalls photography’s metallurgic substrate —silver—and the quasi alchemical nature of work in the darkroom, a process which has almost been entirely eclipsed by digital technologies.”
— Jean-François Renaud

Bloom portraits

Getting down in the grass, I discovered a Lilliputian world…

Lilliput world in the grass. Photo © Andrée Fredette

Springtime flowers are so fresh to winter-weary eyes…

Fawn Lily (Erythronium oregonum) with rain drops. Photo © Andrée Fredette

Above: the sun shines on recent rain drops. This is the back side of a Fawn lily (Erythronium oregonum), a wildflower blooming on the shores of Saturna Island, BC.

 

Rosemary in bloom. Photo © Andrée FredetteMy rosemary has been blooming for months, and I keep trying to get the perfect shot of its fine flowers.

 

Garden bloom. Photo © Andrée Fredette

I forget the name of this spring beauty, its white blooms just punctuate the garden right now.

Muscari and daffodil corona. Macro photography © Andrée Fredette

Contrasting the vibrant blue of grape hyacinth (Muscari ) and the orange corolla of a daffodil.

White bloom, macro photography © Andrée FredetteAn azalea blossom, in close-up.

Daffodial corona detail shot. Macro photography © Andrée FredetteThe edge of a daffodil corona, almost abstract.

And to close this post, a portrait of a tiny visitor in the sedum:

Pacific tree frog. Macro photography © Andrée FredetteSay hello to the Pacific tree frog (Pseudacris regilla), enjoying the sunshine in the rock garden. It’s been a long winter.

Spring at East Point

Photo above: Boiling Reef, near the point, is still an encampment for Steller sea lions, harbour seals, eagles, ducks and more.

On a grey day in spring, it’s a quiet place. Few people, plenty of birds. A rare daytime low tide, too. Great for bird watching…

East Point, Saturna Island, at low tide. Photo © Andrée Fredette

Above: the long nose of East Point, and in the distance, Boiling Reef to the right (the rocks where the big critters lounge), and the tip of Tumbo Island on the left.

There is quite a bit of wildlife at East Point, on Saturna Island… Lots of birds are finishing their winter residence and will soon depart for other locations in BC and Northward.

Harlequin drake (Histrionicus histrionicus) Photo © Andrée Fredette
A Harlequin drake (Histrionicus histrionicus), handsome fellow, at the water’s edge. Waiting for the tide to come back in.

Harlequin hen (Histrionicus Histrionicus). Photo © Andrée Fredette
Not far away, his girlfriend, the female Harlequin. 

Harlequin duck female. Photo © Andrée Fredette
Above: another Harlequin female, standing right where the buffet is happening, as the tide is rising. They seemed to like spots where the returning water was flipping over the sea weeds…

Barrow's Goldeneye (Bucephala islandica). Photo by Andrée Fredette
And this handsome one is a male Barrow’s Goldeneye (Bucephala islandica). Caught him just after he surfaced, water still beading on his plumage.

Steller sea lions, Harbour seals, Bald eagle, gulls and ducks on Boiling Reef. Photo © Andrée Fredette
Above, a view of Boiling Reef, where the Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) are still lounging. They will soon leave to go to their rookery, that party place where all the mating occurs during the summer. To get that shot, I used a long lens because they are far away. The males can reach 7 to 9 feet long, and weigh 1.2 tons… 

Which is why I am all the more impressed by the sang-froid of this diver: 

 

Fresh air and The Birds

Photo above: participants in the “Round the County Sailing Race”, rounding the Lighthouse Point, Patos Island, WA. Photo taken from East Point, Saturna Island, BC, roughly 6 km away…

On Sunday afternoon, I decided to go to East Point, to get some fresh air (and oh yes, the air certainly was fresh…). Although rain was threatening, I went because someone pointed out that a major sailing race was underway in the Orcas islands. The header photo above is the best shot I could get, from 6km away…

The straggler, in the Orcas sailing race. Photo by Andrée Fredette

Above: a straggler, way behind the rest of the participants…

A good breeze was flowing through and I found a large gathering of gulls, all over the rocks.

Masses of gulls at East Point, Saturna Island, BC. Photo by Andrée Fredette

Gulls everywhere, resting while facing the wind.

Immature herring gulls at East Point, Saturna Island, BC. Photo by Andrée Fredette

Above: I think these are junior (not quite mature) herring gulls…

Gull convention at East Point, Saturna island. Photo by Andrée Fredette

It was like a gull convention. Or the prelude to The Birds (you know, the Hitchcock movie…).

And more coming…

Gull in flight at East Point, Saturna Island, BC. Photo by Andrée Fredette

And these caught my eye, because of their red beaks…

Heerman's gulls, East Point, Saturna Island, BC. Photo by Andrée Fredette

I had to look them up today: they are Heerman’s gulls, and these waters are probably their northernmost habitat on the Pacific Northwest.

Harlequin ducks, East Point, Saturna Island, BC. Photo by Andrée Fredette

There were all kinds of Harlequin ducks, fishing around the point. Above, a lovely couple. The gulls kept trying to fly close, land next to the ducks after they surfaced, to steal whatever they had caught…

Oops, the hen dove and the drake gets to pose for the camera…

Harlequin drake, East Point, Saturna Island, BC. Photo by Andrée Fredette

Here is a harlequin hen, at the shore…

Harlequin hen, East Point, Saturna Island, BC. Photo by Andrée Fredette

And then there were the little ones, the sandpipers, scurrying between the gulls. They are so tiny and quick, and their camouflage colours are so efficient that they are hard to spot…

Sandpiper, East Point, Saturna Island, BC. Photo by Andrée Fredette

Snack time…

Sandpiper finding a snack. East Point, Saturna Island, BC. Photo by Andrée Fredette

After a couple of hours, my fingers started to feel frozen (note to self: bring gloves, next time), so I decided to head home.

I leave you with a shot from the night before, a Saturday evening sunset minuet:

Silhouette sunset. Photo by Andrée Fredette